Read Alone in the Purple: A Story of the Last Days of King Ludwig II of Bavaria by Clarissa Lohde Margarethe Pancritius Online

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A story of the last days of King Ludwig II of Bavaria. Translated from the German by Margarethe Pancritius. Originally published circa 1912.Lohde's story centers around the end of Ludwig's reign in 1886 and concerns a plot by his ministers and other members of Bavarian society to have him declared mad and deposed and the few loyal friends who tried to warn the monarch of hA story of the last days of King Ludwig II of Bavaria. Translated from the German by Margarethe Pancritius. Originally published circa 1912.Lohde's story centers around the end of Ludwig's reign in 1886 and concerns a plot by his ministers and other members of Bavarian society to have him declared mad and deposed and the few loyal friends who tried to warn the monarch of his impending downfall.Excerpt from Alone in the Purple: A Story of the Last Days of King Ludwig II. Of Bavaria On a clear Autumn morning a young man with a knapsack on his back could be seen walking briskly up the King's highway. The road in its many windings offered magnificent views, here a glimpse of a quiet valley, there a wood encircled cloister and higher up sharp, craggy rocks rising against a background of snow-capped peaks. The young man lifted his hat, and gazed admiringly about him. His fresh young face showed no trace of care or sorrow, and his brown cheeks spoke of health and love of life. As he was about to proceed, he noticed a cloud of dust rising at the turn of the way near the convent, and he had hardly time to step back, when a carriage rolled past him. It was a light hunting-wagon drawn by a splendid span of golden brown horses. The only occupant of the vehicle sat motionless wrapped in his mantle, his hat draw-n closely over his face. "The King," murmured the young man and a troubled look came over his joyous face. He continued his way thoughtfully and soon reached the gate of the Royal Park, through which the carriage must have just passed. The gate had quickly closed, and a guard, walking to and fro, answered his inquiring look by pointing to the road of the Almen Inn as his probable destination. He lifted his hat and took the direction indicated. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works....

Title : Alone in the Purple: A Story of the Last Days of King Ludwig II of Bavaria
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ISBN : 9781436639880
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 272 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Alone in the Purple: A Story of the Last Days of King Ludwig II of Bavaria Reviews

  • Steve
    2018-11-12 20:41

    Originally published in Germany in 1912, this novel about King Ludwig II of Bavaria is the closest in time to Ludwig's reign (he was deposed and died in 1886) that I've been able to find in English. The novel definitely has a 19th Century feel to it, with a good bit of melodrama and weeping aristocratic ladies and honor-bound gentlemen. I can't guess how much of the facts of Ludwig's life or death were known to Lohde or anyone else in 1912. Many of the characters as they appear in this story appear to have been completely invented and have no historical basis - same goes for the romantic subplots and the spurned ex-(female)lover of Ludwig whose bitterness plays a crucial role in his downfall. None of this is to be found in the biographies of Ludwig that I've read. It is not surprising that Ludwig's homosexuality is never mentioned or dealt with, although there is an odd and brief reference to him being a woman-hater. Still, it's not a bad little story for the time period and Lohde's portrayal of Ludwig is sympathetic - a distinguished monarch whose vision who was misunderstood. He is shown as surrounded by a court that wanted to undermine him for their own personal gain or to fulfill some vendetta, while his public loved him. In the end Ludwig is shown as making choices that would be the best for his people and that would protect those few friends who had remained faithful and loyal. That might be the biggest honor which an author can bestow on a leader's legacy.