Read The Real David Copperfield by Robert Graves Online

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Robert Graves contends that half the words in Charles Dickens' classic add nothing to the story. The original was written in serial form over 20 months while Dickens formed the habit of turning out an installment a month, seldom looking more than a couple of months ahead for plot development. While ensuring regular payment, this strongly prejudiced the eventual unity of thRobert Graves contends that half the words in Charles Dickens' classic add nothing to the story. The original was written in serial form over 20 months while Dickens formed the habit of turning out an installment a month, seldom looking more than a couple of months ahead for plot development. While ensuring regular payment, this strongly prejudiced the eventual unity of the whole. To reduce the length of the book without sacrificing continuity Graves felt he must re-write the whole. What he attempts is the restoration of the novel to what he feels is its natural length and plot. There has been no modernization, merely a tightening-up, a picking-up of the dropped threads of magazine laxity--with countless small changes and additions--the goal being to make DAVID COPPERFIELD accessible to the modern reader....

Title : The Real David Copperfield
Author :
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ISBN : 9780736625401
Format Type : Audio Cassette
Number of Pages : 0 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Real David Copperfield Reviews

  • Greg Deane
    2018-09-11 03:13

    A straightforward work that cuts out a lot of Dickens' mawkish sentimentality while retaining many of the social and economic insights of the original. But the relative brevity tends to bring out the class differences of the time and treats them as the natural order of things-so that young seamstresses like Martha or the anti-heroine Emily who aspired to marry above themselves were bound to become fallen women who would never be able to face their neighbours who knew them before their shame. The middle and upper class characters, though, all have flaws that can be forgiven because of other estimable qualities.Copperfield is rather annoying in the way he always goes along with anyone who dupes him, though it's hard to tell whether his gullibility and weakness are due to vanity, naivete, cowardice or good nature. Though it seems that he hides behind his useless, pretty wife's skirts when he urges Dora to complain to the servant, who has a rough soldier beau constantly with her, to complain about the poor servitude. In fact, the gormless Copperfields have a lot of trouble with servants. Graves'abridged version made me realise what a wasted effort it would be to read the complete original again. Most of the characters irritate me with either their condescension or their deference together with their moral certainty. The only character I didn't particularly mind is the eponymous hero's aunt, Betsy Trotwood.