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This book presents the Buddhist approach to facing the inevitable facts of growing older, getting sick, and dying. These tough realities are not given much attention by many people until midlife, when they become harder to avoid. Using a Buddhist text known as the Five Subjects for Frequent Recollection, Larry Rosenberg shows how intimacy with the realities of aging can acThis book presents the Buddhist approach to facing the inevitable facts of growing older, getting sick, and dying. These tough realities are not given much attention by many people until midlife, when they become harder to avoid. Using a Buddhist text known as the Five Subjects for Frequent Recollection, Larry Rosenberg shows how intimacy with the realities of aging can actually be used as a means to liberation. When we become intimate with these inevitable aspects of life, he writes, we also become intimate with ourselves, with others, with the world—indeed with all things....

Title : Living in the Light of Death: On the Art of Being Truly Alive
Author :
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ISBN : 9781570628207
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Living in the Light of Death: On the Art of Being Truly Alive Reviews

  • Bruce
    2018-11-19 11:47

    Larry Rosenberg, now in his eighties, left a career as a professor of psychology at the University of Chicago and Harvard Medical School to found the Cambridge Insight Meditation Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he still teaches. He is in addition the author of books on Buddhist teachings and practice, particularly in the area of breath meditation.This present book addresses common life experiences that we all face – aging, illness, and dying. Rosenberg examines the tendency of almost all of us, as we come closer and closer to these phenomena as we grow older, to respond with denial and distraction, strategies that are ultimately ineffectual and lead only to continued suffering. He presents an alternative approach rooted in Buddhist teachings, discussing the understanding and practice of meditation on five truths (and I here use the formulations of Ronald D. Siegel):1. I am sure to become old. I cannot avoid aging.2. I am sure to become sick. I cannot avoid illness.3. I am sure to die. I cannot avoid death.4. All things dear and beloved to me are subject to change and separation.5. I am the owner of my actions. I will be the heir to my actions.The deep internalization of these teachings can lead to a profound relinquishment of anxiety about them and a liberating appreciation of life.Buddhism in Rosenberg’s presentation is more a life philosophy of empirical exploration than a religion, a philosophy compatible with many religious perspectives and convictions, or with none at all. In this regard, I myself have been interested to see that more and more booksellers are categorizing Buddhist materials in the Philosophy section rather than the Religion section of their shelves. Rosenberg’s small and helpful book is a welcome addition to the resources available to those interested in exploring these issues that we all face.

  • pennyg
    2018-12-03 07:31

    Simply written and easily understood but profound in concept with antidotes and meditation practices. Gently reminding us old age, illness and death are unavoidable and the importance of living life fully and aware. This is a re-read and has a place on my bedside table beside a very well worn copy of No Death, No Fear by Thich Nhat Hanh.

  • Wendy
    2018-11-21 12:41

    Awesome! This book is about meditation and ways of considering old age, illness and death. It made me feel like I MUST get back to yoga and meditation.Sorry, I guess that's not much of a book review, but being fired up and feeling good counts for a lot I think.

  • Trisha
    2018-12-10 08:26

    This book is based on Buddhism’s five subjects for frequent recollection - specifically old age, sickness and death. Little did I know when I began reading it that it would be so timely, because this year I have had to face the deaths of three dearly loved people. My mother died in February, and my mother-in-law in May, followed by my brother’s death from an inoperable brain tumor in July. I don’t know whether or not having read this book made it any easier because I doubt whether anyone can ever be completely prepared for what we all know will happen eventually. But I do think it helps to have had a chance to think about these things before needing to confront them head on. Although we live in a death-denying culture I’ve found there is great value in learning to recognize death is not something to be feared, but rather to be seen as a natural part of life along with the deep sorrow that follows in its wake when we must be parted from someone we love. And as I read this book I was reminded that the 6th century Rule of St. Benedict says monks should keep death daily before their eyes. Though worlds and generations apart, both St. Benedict and the Buddha knew that to be alive is to come face to face with what it means to die. This past year has given me plenty of opportunity to do that. Saying those final goodbyes was not easy, and neither is the grief work that has followed. But reading this book gave me a chance to become more comfortable with the reality – and the great mystery – that surrounds death. St. Benedict and the Buddha both knew the value of recognizing the transitory nature of life and the fact that each of us will die. I was privileged to be with my mother-in-law during the last hours of her life. And when she drew in her final breath and released it with a little raspy gasp, I was overcome by the mystery of it all. One moment she had still been with us and the next moment she had left us forever. How are we to grapple with something so deeply profound? Coming to terms with that question is one of our challenges as human creatures. And I believe, as does the author of this book, that one of the great lessons to be learned as we confront the reality of death is that life itself is a precious thing to be approached with reverence and lived with intention.

  • Happyreader
    2018-11-10 13:18

    At the end of the day, this book is about being truly intimate with your life. What can be more intimate and meaningful than being present with the stark realities of aging, illness, and death. This book is life-affirming, not morbid. It's a gentle yet profound reminder to not waste our lives on avoiding what is unpleasant and instead to fully inhabit our lives and bodies, regardless of our state of health or age. It's about death reminding us to value and be open to the present moment since nothing more is guaranteed to us. We all know that but do we live that?

  • Elias
    2018-12-08 08:45

    A Buddhist-oriented approach to confronting death. Excellent, clear, and down-to-earth (no pun originally intended).

  • Susan
    2018-11-25 11:29

    An excellent book on Vipassana and Zen meditations. Very readable, practical.

  • Benjamin Barnes
    2018-11-11 12:45

    I definitely enjoyed reading this book back in 2015 after my Grandmother died this little tome helped me adjust to a world without her.

  • Anastasia
    2018-11-29 11:36

    This book was incredibly insighful. I love love loved it! A lot of interesting meditations and really solid research and buddhist philosophy on aging, illness and death.