Read A History of the Crusades, Vol. II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100-1187 by Steven Runciman Online

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Sir Steven Runciman's three volume A History of the Crusades, one of the great classics of English historical writing, is now being reissued. This volume describes the Frankish states of Outremer from the accession of King Baldwin I to the re-conquest of Jerusalem by Saladin. As Runciman says in his preface, 'The politics of the Moslem world in the early twelfth-century deSir Steven Runciman's three volume A History of the Crusades, one of the great classics of English historical writing, is now being reissued. This volume describes the Frankish states of Outremer from the accession of King Baldwin I to the re-conquest of Jerusalem by Saladin. As Runciman says in his preface, 'The politics of the Moslem world in the early twelfth-century defy straightforward analysis, but they must be understood if we are to understand the establishment of the Crusader states and the later causes of the recovery of Islam The main theme in this volume is warfare I have followed the example of the old chroniclers, who knew their business; for war was the background to life in Outremer and the hazards of the battlefield often decided its destiny.'"...

Title : A History of the Crusades, Vol. II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100-1187
Author :
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ISBN : 9780521347716
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 538 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

A History of the Crusades, Vol. II: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East, 1100-1187 Reviews

  • Bryn Hammond
    2019-05-25 07:59

    He may be the comfy old cardigan of Crusader studies now, but I’ve just read this Vol II in conjunction with Christopher Tyerman over these events, and Sir Steven, humane-minded, joying in the plural cultures that were the Holy Land, was rightly knighted, I say.

  • Walter Mendoza
    2019-05-30 02:55

    The second volume: The Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Frankish East; tells us the history of the princedoms, until the Battle of the Horns of Hattin and the defeat of the Kingdom of Jerusalem, the reconquest by Saladyn. An excellent narrative, and a masterpiece of scholarship accuracy and detail. The history of golden age of the Kingdom and Saladyn's rise to power and the complex interactions of the leaders. From the great statesman King Baldwin and the conflictman Reynald de Chatillon. Finally I can say Runciman makes a comprensive and detailed book about the crusades. I recommend this book.

  • Alex Barry
    2019-06-09 03:48

    The middle volume of Professor Runciman's meticulously researched history, dealing with the periods leading up to, and following, the abysmal Second Crusade. A challenging and difficult read, with character names among the Franks, the Byzantines, the Armenians, and the Arabs (among many others) that may seem to repeat and confuse, and many locations largely unknown to the modern western reader. The author's account is not always linear, moving back and forth in time as he recounts details of different actors going through the same events. The reader with awareness of the future short remaining history of Byzantium will be struck with alarm and sadness as the events leading up to the empire's ultimate annihilation are made clear. One is astonished by the revelations of infamous brutality and cruelty among the Franks, in contrast to a commensurate measure of mercy and kindness practiced by certain of the great Arabic leaders. Our western view of knighthood and chivalry is sorely tested by the episodes retold in this book, which are largely based upon first-person accounts copiously cited by the author in comprehensive footnotes and a lengthy bibliography. Not a book I'd recommend to a reader with a casual, passing interest in battles, sieges, and knighthood, but certainly a must-read for those enthralled, as I am, with the history of the place and period, and who have a background in the subjects at hand.

  • Christina
    2019-05-24 23:55

    This book was an excellent reference for the factual details of the period. But, unless you are very interested in the topic, it is dry and tough read because it is so full of the facts. I liked the fact that he got into a lot of the details about the political happenings in the arab world during the period. Over and over, you read and the arab disaray allowed the crusader states to stick around as long as they did. But, Runciman takes you through the issues that the arabs were facing during the period. He also does a good job or speculating on the turning points of crusaders' decisions. He does dedicate one chapter to drawing a picture of what life would have been like in the crusader states, but it rather short and a small percentage compared to the rest of the book. The appendexes are full of good information particularly his discussion of the reports of the Battle of Hattin. Consulting his family trees at the end of the book are a MUST for readers, as the families are more confusing than the Imperial Roman ones! One issue that was a little tough for me, was that he did not use enough dates in his work. I would have appreciated more explicit dates, rather than his style of this happened and then this happened.... I enjoyed reading it at the same time as I was reading a historical fiction novel about the period. Reading the two side by side was a good experience because I was able to use the hard facts from Runciman to ground the fictional novel about the same period.

  • Jeroen
    2019-06-08 03:39

    A classic in history literature. Just as good as Sicilian Vespers.

  • Joe
    2019-06-08 00:01

    Although this was published in the 1950s the three volumes are still a very serviceable introduction to the Crusades. This is a top down narrative history mostly taken-up with dynastic struggles between Crusaders and Byzantines, Crusaders and Muslims, Muslims and Byzantines, Muslims and Muslims, Mongols and Muslims, and Crusaders and CrusadersThe success of the first Crusade was quite astonishing. A not very well organised group of competing noblemen managed to march their army via Byzantium into the Levant and carve out a kingdom and retake Jerusalem within the space of a year or two. Of course the infighting, greed, pride, ambition, stupidity (the usual suspects) combined with formidable external threats from the Muslim world helped to bring the whole thing down less than two centuries later.I think when I read another history of the Crusades I’d like more social, economic, cultural details than I got here, but this was still a very enjoyable and informative read.

  • Ken
    2019-06-01 03:48

    "The Kingdom of Jerusalem" is a far better read than Vol. I "The First Crusade". It is still a substantial amount of information to take in. By now though, thanks to the foundation gained by reading Vol. I the names and places are more familiar. This History is better documented than the previous book and the personalities on all sides are delved into a bit deeper. You gain a better understanding of the establishment of the Kingdom, it's princes petty jealousies and Islam's ultimate triumph over the Franks. Let's just say Hollywood's "Kingdom of Heaven" film took a massive amount of artistic liberty in the telling of this History. This History is an eye-opener and to anybody who wants to gain a better understanding of where the Jihadist mentality came from, crack open this book and give it a go!

  • Olethros
    2019-06-03 02:48

    -Erudición y entretenimiento no tienen que enfrentarse, al menos no necesariamente-. Género. Historia.Lo que nos cuenta. Desde la Primera Cruzada, con una mirada hacia atrás para entender el sustrato del Imperio Romano y su herencia, hasta la caída de San Juan de Acre, con una mirada hacia delante hasta Pio II para entender sus estertores, retrato pormenorizado y cronológico de los hechos, personajes y acontecimientos que construyeron el fenómeno conocido como Las Cruzadas.¿Quiere saber más del libro, sin spoilers? Visite:http://librosdeolethros.blogspot.com/...

  • Stosch
    2019-06-08 01:00

    its rated highly by most readers but i think it lacks focus and doesnt progress right. it also reads alot like the bible. he rattles off a l0ng list of people and their relatives, marriages, then the name of territory. perhaps 7 or 8 relationships with very little detail. reminds me of sections of the old testament. then when theres action its flat. i really wanted to like it. library had the hardcover 3 vol set. i read about 150 pages of each vol and its all the same structure. not fun to read at all.

  • Unni krishnan
    2019-06-15 07:36

    amazing ... traces the tragi-comic accounts of the second crusades ,aftereffects of the first crusades..an illuminating account of the rise of zengi,Nur ed din and of course the Sultan... salah ed din otherwise known as saladin...the deference to detail , the geopolitical detail in this book as in first is amazing...

  • Fran
    2019-05-17 07:42

    Okay, so I mainly read the bits about Balian of Ibelin because I have a serious crush on the guy, but Runciman's history book is the best I've ever read. I don't even like non-fiction all that much, but I've gone back and reread bits of this multiple times.

  • David
    2019-05-26 03:00

    A must for anyone who wants to be truly out of date

  • rati
    2019-05-17 00:01

    FS ed.

  • Thomas Harlan
    2019-05-21 07:54

    Put this one back on the shelf. Too depressing.