Read The Witchery by James Reese Online

the-witchery

New York Times bestselling author James Reese has been praised for his lush and evocative prose, his bold exploration of illicit sexuality, his deft handling of historical settings, and his extraordinary rendering of the supernatural. His novels are sumptuous trips back in time to an era filled with unforgettable characters, human strife, and emotions that transcend time.New York Times bestselling author James Reese has been praised for his lush and evocative prose, his bold exploration of illicit sexuality, his deft handling of historical settings, and his extraordinary rendering of the supernatural. His novels are sumptuous trips back in time to an era filled with unforgettable characters, human strife, and emotions that transcend time. Now, in his most imaginative book to date, Reese takes the witch Herculine on a voyage that will test her in every way, elevating her from the depths of despair to triumph.In the middle decades of the nineteenth century, Herculine is summoned from self-imposed exile by her teacher, the witch Sebastiana d'Azur, and told to sail from the Florida territory to Havana. There she is to search out one Queverdo Brù—a cruel and demonic man whose house holds terrible secrets—to learn of a certain "surprise." But lies and truths conspire to separate Herculine from those she loves, and she finds herself alone with Brù, who sees in her something he has long sought, and now seeks to use, harshly, as he practices that most ancient of arts: alchemy.Escaping Brù, Herculine sails from Havana, knowing Sebastiana is near. In the Florida Keys, she reunites with her and meets her "surprise"—the shocking product of a forbidden encounter ten years prior. Surviving an Indian attack on a sparsely settled key, Herculine and family decamp to Key West. There they set out to make their fortune—by means magical or otherwise—as Herculine is tested at every turn by the harsh landscape and haunted by thoughts of her own demise.With The Witchery, James Reese brings to a close a remarkable trilogy—a story told by a character who "invades our consciousness" (Tampa Tribune) and set in "the heady atmosphere of a bygone era brought deftly to life" (Eric Van Lustbader). Spanning decades ravaged by war, disease, and ideals that tore a nation apart, Herculine's ultimately triumphant struggle is both a universal one—marked by love, loss, fear, and regret—and yet quite particular, as told by one of the most inventive novelists working today....

Title : The Witchery
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780060561086
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 467 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Witchery Reviews

  • Kait
    2019-03-23 19:40

    I enjoyed reading The Witchery, although there were times that I found Herculine to talk on and on about very little to do with the plot. However, I did find the wordiness and description to be beautiful and well done. The parts that took place in Havanna were interesting and creative. I found the overall story fairly captivating. I'm not sure if it is because I was fairly invested due to reading the two books prior, but I still enjoyed the final installment in Herculine's tale.The Witchery was different from Book of Shadows and Book of Spirits in that it wasn't nearly as erotic. I found that the eroticism much more hinted at, except in very few parts where it was spelled out more or less. This was fine with me - while I'm not one to balk at sex scenes, I didn't feel that more was needed to be said than was said. The one thing that really bothered me was the cover. There's a woman splashing around in a pool of water (possibly the sea?), but I don't understand what the purpose (other than possibly sales) could be. Herculine isn't all "I'm a sex goddess with a great figure, watch me splash around in the water", nor are any of the other characters - not enough to put them on the cover. I think that the publisher could have done something more true to the book. I would have preferred to see a cover that made me think of fire, or even a cover with hummingbirds that seemed to glow on it. I suppose one could say that I am tired of the age-old thought that if you throw a sexy woman on the cover of a book that it will sell better. I personally picked up this book because of the author, not because of the cover. Overall, I enjoyed this book, but I'm not sure that it would interest any of my friends. Therefore I'm not recommending it to anyone. If anyone is looking for a dark, gothic erotic witch-type book, I would recommend picking up Book of Shadows, the first in the series. Reese weaves a spell-binding tale.

  • Tommy
    2019-03-16 22:37

    I was sad when I reached the end of this third and final book about the French witch Herculine, set in the 1800s. The first book (The Book of Shadows) I really enjoyed, then the second one (The Book of Spirits) I really enjoyed PARTS of, but kind of got bored. Then this final volume hit everything right on the mark for me. Especially when Herculine assembles her "family," made up of the handsome sailor lad Calixto (who goes both ways), and two other characters I won't spoil for you. "The Witchery" of the title is at first a special room where Herculine and her witchy sisters can work their craft. Then eventually there is an entire house christened "The Witchery." They have a mummified "mermaid," and a skull on the desk, and windows made from glass tintypes of the dead. I totally wanted to live there with them!!! Herculine's narration is engrossing and charming, and sometimes I get frustrated when she gives HINTS of important/terrible things to come, then makes you wait through a lavishly-described lead-in. But I love it. This is the only author I would truly compare favorably to Anne Rice. Oh-! I can't believe I almost forgot to mention that Herculine has a certain anatomical peculiarity that makes "her" unique.

  • Rose
    2019-03-07 17:22

    really good ..wish he would hurry up and write another

  • Jimmy
    2019-03-06 21:15

    This is the concluding book in the Herculine trilogy. Like the previous two books, it is written by Herculine in a diary fashion. Because it is written different than other books, I was forced to read it slower in order to understand what the authors (Herculine & Reese) are trying to convey. I was also forced to do a little research on the internet, to discover what a few of the French words meant (words like enfin, alors, and bref that are used again and again). As Henri, she sails for Havana, presumably to meet Sebastiana. (view spoiler)[On the sail there, she falls in love with Calixto, whom she saves from a demon of a man. But this does not save her love because he witnesses her use of the Craft, and sets sail out of Cuba before she is able to explain herself.(hide spoiler)]As Herculine, she is lured by Q., an African alchemist, who is in search of the Philosopher's stone. To achieve his Perfection, he needs where both male and female meet. Unsure of S. coming to Havana, she studies alchemy with Q. The book is pretty boring and a slow start, until part two. Once part two is finished, the story slows down again. Altogether, a good read of H.'s death, with a little too much history lesson for my taste. But, the authors know that, apologize for it, and move on with the story.

  • C Joy
    2019-02-22 18:28

    This book is rich in plot, descriptive writing, prose, and poetry. I don't even know where to start this review. The only thing I didn't like about it is the withholding of a certain story, the explanation of how something went, because Herculine backtracks every now and then, like arranging the pieces of a puzzle.It had a gripping start, it dragged for a while during the Quevedo Bru arc, and the way James Reese wrote those parts, it was very vivid, the writing lets the imagination run wild, Reese was able to convey Herculine's feelings and suck the reader in that realm. The suspense was unexpected, things started to heat up when Herculine realized she's in danger, and even more suspenseful was how she got out of it, I didn't see that coming.Given that, I loved the unpredictability of this book, since this is divided into 4 parts, each has a surprise until the end. One would wonder how she wrote the events as a journal that happened in a span of about 5 years while she was dead, occupying someone's body. There was adequate balance in the storytelling, while the details were described vividly, others were suggested, not stated outright. Although Reese might have intended this book as a perfect ending, in truth it still has an open end.

  • Jimmy
    2019-02-23 22:22

    This is the concluding book in the Herculine trilogy. Like the previous two books, it is written by Herculine in a diary fashion. Because it is written different than other books, I was forced to read it slower in order to understand what the authors (Herculine & Reese) are trying to convey. I was also forced to do a little research on the internet, to discover what a few of the French words meant (words like enfin, alors, and bref that are used again and again). As Henri, she sails for Havana, presumably to meet Sebastiana. (view spoiler)[On the sail there, she falls in love with Calixto, whom she saves from a demon of a man. But this does not save her love because he witnesses her use of the Craft, and sets sail out of Cuba before she is able to explain herself.(hide spoiler)]As Herculine, she is lured by Q., an African alchemist, who is in search of the Philosopher's stone. To achieve his Perfection, he needs where both male and female meet. Unsure of S. coming to Havana, she studies alchemy with Q. The book is pretty boring and a slow start, until part two. Once part two is finished, the story slows down again. Altogether, a good read of H.'s death, with a little too much history lesson for my taste. But, the authors know that, apologize for it, and move on with the story.

  • Iyanna
    2019-03-22 17:16

    I finished this book today. I must say I felt bereft when it ended. I enjoyed all three of the books in this series and contrary to the feedback left by most readers, I enjoyed James Reese's use of the language. The narrative was written in first person by a witch who was supposed to have lived in the late 17-early 1800's, and I felt the use of language and dialect was authentic. The feel was gothic which solidified the main character's authenticity for me. Also, the flowery and overly descriptive prose often belied what really was a graphic (both sexually and otherwise)story filled with violence and the macabre. I encourage people to read it despite some of the negative feedback. Luckily for me, I started them before I saw the reviews and may have been encouraged to not read them. But I'm glad I did. This is a talented writer, who provides a wealth of historical context to his novels that adds to, rather than detracts from the story, the action and the character development. If only textbooks were written in this mannter; we'd be churning more historians out of today's classrooms.

  • Carrie
    2019-03-10 22:30

    I started this book back in 2007 when I picked it up in an airport bookshop. My hope was that it would be reminiscent of Anne Rice's The Witching Hour but alas it was a far cry. Reese's writing style was very difficult to get a handle on. Starting chapters and ultimately the entire book with something seemingly out of place and making no sense and then spending the rest of the chapter bringing it to light. The French sprinkled throughout was also somewhat annoying. There are moments of inspiration but for the most part I felt I was reading someone's diary filled with things that only the writer would find interesting.

  • Brooks Milam
    2019-03-09 23:21

    I've been greatly disappointed by this trilogy. I bought all three with high hopes based on the recommendations of Diana Gabaldon and Anne Rice, so I felt committed to complete my reading of them. Reese interrupts the narrative repeatedly to go on and on about historical events that have little if any effect on the story and the character's life. It's as though Reese wants his audience to sit in awe of his historical research and knowledge rather than developing a good character about whom one can empathize. Additionally, for three books of approximately 400 pages each, he has only one character whom he attempts to develop and truly he barely does that.

  • Tracy
    2019-02-21 19:18

    James Reese is a master of loose ends, explaining even the smallest detail that you might wonder about for months after finishing a book. This trilogy was the most rewarding literary find I've encountered in YEARS! In fact, it absolutely made my summer fly by. If you haven't yet read his works, please do yourself a favor and check out "Book of Shadows", "Book of Spirits" and "The Witchery". You'll be glad you did. PS. If you're a witch, you'll appreciate these even more. I promise!

  • Lisa
    2019-03-01 21:34

    This one took a while for me to get going. It was slow to start then got completly stuck with a section that involved too much waffle. About two thirds of the way through the book at last got going and I wanted to keep reading right to the end. A mixed bunch this one, reminded me of being stuck in the traffic then at last the lights go green!

  • Talva Burnette
    2019-03-22 16:18

    Excellent book, deep dark and a bit funny. Written in a voice that is at first hard to read but then because a song I liked to hear sung. Very complex characters and storyline. A great story with a bit of an education while you read. Love it!

  • Marissa
    2019-02-26 23:21

    OK so not quite as good as #1 or #2 in the series but definately a continuaton of the story and by the time I started this book I was very invested in the characters. Some really strange pliot twists (I mean even stranger than in the first 2 books) but still enjoyed the read, a lot.

  • Hilary
    2019-03-04 18:38

    I really loved this series. The wording and vocabulary was an absolute delight. The plot was very interesting and engaging, as were the characters. I didn't want it to end!

  • Kit★
    2019-02-23 17:39

    I read the first two books in the set years ago and loved em, but I hardly remember them now. Will have to re-read before going on to this one.

  • Tish williams
    2019-03-21 21:20

    Entertaining, historical. Good light reading. Typical of gothic style.

  • Brittany
    2019-02-23 23:29

    I really love this book series. Not many books suck me in much but this one is a page turner. I found myself sad because the series was over, its one of those. Great job to the author James Reese

  • Roberta
    2019-03-08 16:18

    It's starting off like his other books...leading you down the path!

  • Tashie
    2019-03-03 15:25

    If you like a historically set fiction book than this is the series for you. I didn't enjoy this as much as the first two books in the series but it was still a really good read.

  • Mary
    2019-02-22 22:36

    I've been reading this since August... I think I might not like it.