Read the asexual equation by R.J. Seeley Online

the-asexual-equation

The anxious asexual Jake Logan is the main focus of his biologist best friend's experiment but Harvey's experiment brings up feelings for Jake and instead of focusing on his experiment, the boys go on a journey to find the source of Jake's anxiety which means a four hour drive across the country to go and see his dad....

Title : the asexual equation
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 23339576
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 115 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

the asexual equation Reviews

  • Andrew
    2019-02-26 07:31

    I'm extremely happy to see asexuality (and even pansexuality) mentioned and written about in books. In saying that, I don't think this was particularly good at explaining or expressing asexuality. It seemed very "this is how an asexual should be", "this is what an asexual feels/does", "this is how asexuals feel about sex", when a lot of what is said isn't 100% accurate. Being asexual means you have a lack of sexual attraction and it doesn't always affect your libido. There are asexuals (like the main character) who are sex repulsed whereas there are other asexuals who perform sexual acts for multiple reasons, whether that be for reproducing, making their partner happy or for plain pure enjoyment of the act itself.Whether you're a sex repulsed asexual or a sex loving asexual, it does not in any way invalidate your experience.Not only the above problem but I had a hard time reading through this as the writing style wasn't the best and the sentences seemed very disjointed and thrown together. Not to mention the punctuation and grammar-However I do encourage the author to continue writing and learning (and by learning, I mean within writing and describing).

  • Rebecca McNutt
    2019-03-09 08:30

    There aren't many books out there with asexual characters (finally a romance-type book with a main character who isn't into rolling around with someone else like an animal!), and I liked the author's writing style. This book is more about family and acceptance than it is about anything else.

  • Seline
    2019-02-23 12:31

    This book is about a 17/18 year old twin who suffers from anxiety and who is asexual. The entire story is well thought-through, the characters are very symapthetic and it's a pleasure to read. I myself suffer from anxiety so I can relate very well with him. The asexual part is very interesting to read because you don't come across somebody like that in 'normal' life very often.would definitely recommend this book to anybody who's a little bit interested in Psychology but also to everybody else. It opens eyes.The only thing that bothered me were the spelling mistakes. There were a lot of them, for example 'your' and 'you're', which is easy to get right.

  • Amy
    2019-03-02 08:24

    So, if you decide for this book be prepared that it was self-published, and the author has dyslexia and so you will find there many grammar mistakes. Really many, since no one edited it.If you can look through all the mistakes you have a really nice short book, with sympathetic characters, nice plot and also a nice and easy story-line. Don't have too high expectations, because this book is really more for relaxation. When I read it it really made me calm down and kinda happy of how cute and sweet it was. Were more people like this the world would really be a better place.

  • Elly
    2019-02-28 12:30

    This is the first book I've given up on in a long time.I really, really wanted to like this book. The synopsis sucked me in and I'm a huge fan of asexual protagonists in general because I identify with them well. That said, I got 14% of the way through this book (says my Kindle) before I had to stop.The writing style and the mechanics of the writing could really use some work. Punctuation is routinely missing or present when it shouldn't be, sentence structure is frequently choppy or extremely unwieldy. Sometimes whole paragraphs are single sentences. I try to cut authors, especially self-published authors, a lot of slack on editing, but the writing style is so confusing that it can make it difficult to follow what's happening. This book would have been vastly improved by an editor.As to the plot: like I said, I stopped under a quarter of the way through, so maybe it took a dramatic turn for the better. I can't tell if life is just very different in the UK, but my suspension of disbelief was basically immediately demolished by the start of the "experiment" mentioned in the book's summary, which turns out to be an extraordinarily flimsy excuse to put the protagonist into increasingly uncomfortable sexual situations. I was so disappointed by this, but also I just can't believe that anyone could conduct such an "experiment" under the auspices of education. For one, it's extraordinarily unethical, but also has a single subject, no controls, and is generally a transparent excuse for Harvey to... etc. I put the book down immediately when Harvey described "Experiment M". The idea that this is somehow part of a university admission process just doesn't fit.Also, I feel like if a student was missing school to the extent that their attendance fell below 70% overall, and when confronted by the principal they said they had an anxiety disorder so severe that they could not regularly attend school, the response would not be "you have to attend school every day for the next week or be expelled." The entire exchange between Jake and the school principal basically beggared belief - for comparison, where I attended high school, if I had missed more than nine or ten days in an entire school year the authorities would have become involved. The idea that a student could miss that many school days and then be presented with such an ultimatum instead of... well, anything else, really, seemed so far-fetched that it pulled me out of the story.All in all, I liked the idea of the book, but the execution in terms of writing style, plot, and characterization was very poor. I hope the author uses an experienced editor in the future.

  • R.J. Seeley
    2019-03-03 08:24