Read Hands-On Programming with R: Write Your Own Functions and Simulations by Garrett Grolemund Online

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Learn how to program by diving into the R language, and then use your newfound skills to solve practical data science problems. With this book, you'll learn how to load data, assemble and disassemble data objects, navigate R's environment system, write your own functions, and use all of R's programming tools.RStudio Master Instructor Garrett Grolemund not only teaches youLearn how to program by diving into the R language, and then use your newfound skills to solve practical data science problems. With this book, you'll learn how to load data, assemble and disassemble data objects, navigate R's environment system, write your own functions, and use all of R's programming tools.RStudio Master Instructor Garrett Grolemund not only teaches you how to program, but also shows you how to get more from R than just visualizing and modeling data. You'll gain valuable programming skills and support your work as a data scientist at the same time.Work hands-on with three practical data analysis projects based on casino gamesStore, retrieve, and change data values in your computer's memoryWrite programs and simulations that outperform those written by typical R usersUse R programming tools such as if else statements, for loops, and S3 classesLearn how to write lightning-fast vectorized R codeTake advantage of R's package system and debugging toolsPractice and apply R programming concepts as you learn them...

Title : Hands-On Programming with R: Write Your Own Functions and Simulations
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781449359102
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 250 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Hands-On Programming with R: Write Your Own Functions and Simulations Reviews

  • Peter Baumgartner
    2018-12-06 10:31

    A very gentle introduction to programming with R. It starts very easy but covers step by step a wide range of topics. If you want to learn R from scratch and you are a newcomer to programming, then this book is definite for you!I endorse very much the pedagogical concept of this book. It teaches you all the knowledge to master the R programming language by way of three practical challenges: Simulating weighted dice, playing cards and a slot machine. These projects are chosen in a way to learn not only to program but also to understand important concepts of data science like sampling without and with replication. You will learn to write your first function already in chapter one!

  • Marc
    2018-12-07 15:25

    Another great resource for learning R. While it is frustrating that all these books cover the same basic information they all cover it slightly differently. This book coming from the RStudio's chief trainer is a well designed book which covers many aspects not covered as well as other books.R as a programing language has also evolved so much over the past 5 years that I find that the newer books are a better start for beginners, not that the classics should be skipped. This book has a cleaner narrower focus and is a great fit for someone new to R. It uses less libraries and the libraries it uses are clean and make working with R easier. Also I couldn't imagine working with R without using RStudio and this book also shows short cuts on the language's best IDE that is free for personal use.My suggestion is that someone with little to no experience programing should maybe get two books to learn R. 1) R for Everyone by Jared P. Lander (Though the font for the code in Kindle is frustrating because it doesn't show symbols correctly unless you copy and paste the code!) 2) Hands-On Programming with R by Garrett Gromlemund. Than after under standing these books and maybe doing a few free online courses get 1) The Art of R Programming by Norman Matloff and 2) R in Action by Robert Kabacoff (Only available for sale at the publishers website for the EBook)What I want is a second book on using Hadley Wickham's libraries as a second book. Using Reshape2, ddplyr, tidyr, stringr, tidyr, ggplot2, ggvis and shiny.

  • Arthur
    2018-11-21 12:35

    In short, it is fun, fun to read! Every chapter or exercise is full of tasteful, useful insight as the author takes you thru accomplishing several very engaging projects. You will learn a wealth of not so obvious techniques which will help you build better performing, more accurate apps, faster working code with fewer bugs and jump with you into some under-explored areas or R.I like the part on vectorization the most, and even tried to change my code to doing it,but it is still a work in progress as I can't QA my change to my liking. The other parts of the book that I liked and trust will be of help to most readers are working with data-frames, matrices, vectors,lists, also environments (did not see this covered anywhere else).S3/4 and ref classes were, and largely remain obscure after reading this book. The plotting was hardly covered. Pity, it is such an in-demand topic.Integration with other languages is not there, too.So, there is room for more improvement, nevertheless, the book I foresee will spark more interest in exploring R further.The bottom line is,the book can serve as an additional or supplementary material and inspire more reading.I am giving this book four stars out of five.Disclaimer: the book was provided to me for free under the O'Reilly reader review program rules.

  • Helen
    2018-11-28 15:46

    Just at this time I started reading R Cookbook by Paul Teetor and like it much better.

  • Sergii Khomenko
    2018-12-07 07:39

    A nice entry level book: would recommend to people who interested to start with R, for myself found just a couple interesting moments.

  • Sefa
    2018-12-08 12:35

    Yet another introductory R programming book. You can get the whole list here: http://www.r-project.org/doc/bib/R-bo...

  • Delhi Irc
    2018-11-12 09:22

    DL027822 ND6