Read transmetropolitan vol 8 dirge by Warren Ellis Darick Robertson Online

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Investigative reporter Spider Jerusalem attacks the injustices of the 21st Century surroundings while working for the newspaper The Word in this critically-acclaimed graphic novel series written by comics superstar Warren Ellis, the co-creator of PLANETARY and THE AUTHORITY. In this eighth volume collecting issues #43-48 of the groundbreaking VERTIGO title, all hell breaksInvestigative reporter Spider Jerusalem attacks the injustices of the 21st Century surroundings while working for the newspaper The Word in this critically-acclaimed graphic novel series written by comics superstar Warren Ellis, the co-creator of PLANETARY and THE AUTHORITY. In this eighth volume collecting issues #43-48 of the groundbreaking VERTIGO title, all hell breaks loose as a nameless sniper terrorizes the Print District and a raging superstorm clears the streets of The City....

Title : transmetropolitan vol 8 dirge
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 20170322
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 144 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

transmetropolitan vol 8 dirge Reviews

  • Sesana
    2018-10-20 09:33

    It's getting kind of stressful to read this series. Not because it's bad. I'm invested in these characters and I'm getting absorbed in this crazy world. And there's at least one more shoe left to drop. I can feel it. It's made each volume a little harder to pick up, because I know something awful will happen. But I can't stay away, because I need to know what will happen. This is no exception. It's interesting how Ellis can just keep raising the stakes all the time without it feeling like artificial drama.

  • Joni
    2018-10-12 10:33

    Un tomo que lee muy rápido, se agregan un par de elementos dramáticos para el inminente final, la confrontación entre Spider y Callahan se recrudece sin importar los sacrificios que amerite. Dos tomos y esto se termina...

  • Sam Quixote
    2018-10-03 12:16

    Warren Ellis has written the series so far with 3-issue bursts of a linear story with a couple of one shot issues that either expand the world or are side stories to the overall story arc but with “Dirge” he ditches this arrangement and goes straight out for the story arc. A sniper is picking off innocents in the Print District at the same time the police have “blue flu” and decide to call in sick, en masse. Something’s up and Spider’s on the case. If the carnage wreaked by the sniper weren’t enough, a ruinstorm (like a tsunami) hits the east coast turning the City into a disaster zone. And if that weren’t enough for a bad day, Spider gets the medical verdict on his recent health problems…“Dirge” takes what was already an insanely addictive storyline and turns it up to 11. From the opening shots of the sniper to the crescendo of the disaster weather, Ellis doesn’t let up on the throttle for a moment, careening the reader from one maniacal scene to another. He brings it down slowly for Spider to find out he has a brain disease and a limited amount of time before it destroys his mind, and then sends Spider into the penultimate confrontation between himself and the Smiler. This book is a roller-coaster journey for fans of the series and only serves to whet the reader’s appetite for more. Masterful storytelling from Ellis, art from Darick Robertson which is the best work he’s done on the series yet, this is a must-read for any fans of the series and an example of how comics can be more interesting than movies, TV, or the internet when it’s this good.

  • Hilary
    2018-10-19 14:40

    I hate it here, but I love this series.Warren Ellis has crafted the outrageous gonzo journalist from sheer hate, cynicism, rage, and good humor. He has infused him with an altruism that is remarkable and relentless, a thirst for justice purely unquenchable, and a righteous wrath that would set any red-blooded human's heart a-pumping. Transmetropolitan is priceless, and truly shocking in the way the cyberpunk series continues to hit home.With the [ author: H.L. Mencken] quote in Gouge Away Warren Ellis set the stage for the final story arc, the only story arc in some ways, that is bringing the series racing towards its finish. The startling pace and the true tragedy of this issue bring it home to the reader that this isn't your normal graphic novel - nor even remotely close to being such.What I mean is, I care about these characters. The worry I feel is as real as the way my throat closed when the diagnosis was set down. I care about these characters, I care about their quest, and I care about the final dredges of humanity that Warren Ellis has so cleverly infused into the new scum and the dreaded audience that Spider Jerusalem preaches to. Man, I care about these characters... and as much as I want to finish the series, to see how the final battle goes down and watch the e-ink dry on the strangely iPad like tablets... I also don't want to finish the series and see these characters go. They've touched my heart, and the plot has set the wheels in my own brain racing.And I thought I loved Preacher. Transmetropolitan takes this medium to a whole new level.

  • Jedi JC Daquis
    2018-10-08 15:15

    Finally, something substantial happened in Dirge! after two to three volumes of going almost nothing, Spider Jerusalem and his filthy assistants make a nove against the Smiler, but this volume also shows how powerful their opponent is. Well, that would be obvious since they are going against the president.Spider's sickness is also taking a toll on him and the doctor said he may not live that long.This volume gains up some speed, which tells me that the next one would be an awesome one, a head-to-head battle between journalism and politics, both sides geared up for the warfare.

  • Craig
    2018-10-21 13:25

    The parallels between this story and our current political situation are eerily prescient. Ellis is some sort of genius.

  • HFK
    2018-10-05 14:29

    Dirge is the ultimate kick start to the remaining two volumes in the Transmetropolitan series with its fast pace and with its quick build up to the finale. The hard gets harder, the going gets tough, the world crumbles under the radar of the ordinary city people, the seeds for the future ending have been planted, and it is time for Mr. Jerusalem to shout out the declaration of war. The pen shall be mightier than the sword.

  • Benoit Lelièvre
    2018-09-21 11:20

    This series started really strong, but it became kind of a hit-and-miss over time. This one here has a competent overarching plot that ties-in to earlier volumes and actual development that matters in the big picture. It's competent and fun to read, but once again Spider doesn't use the system to make the Smiler's life miserable and we're left with a standard cyberpunk thriller that rides its own reputation. DIRGE is a better volume than SPIDER'S TRASH, but it's still not up to par with the early material that made TRANSMETROPOLITAN great. I hope the ending doesn't disappoint me.

  • Joshua
    2018-10-15 10:24

    I don't have too much to say except that this series continues to excel. I'll probably have a long review about the entire series with the last book, but as of this reading I can just say that this book continues the greatness of the series. Couldn't put it down.

  • Jeraviz
    2018-10-08 14:13

    La cosa se va acabando y las piezas se van situando en el tablero para el final, que promete ser apoteósico.

  • J.G. Keely
    2018-10-02 14:35

    Series review here. My Suggested Reading In Comics

  • Danielle
    2018-09-24 08:31

    Excellent, as usual. One of my favorites of the series. I got a little choked up a couple times - I've become really invested in this story.

  • Clare Fitzgerald
    2018-09-29 08:26

    Warren Ellis’Transmetropolitan, Vol 8: Dirge continues the story of Spider’s attempt to take down the Smiler, and the Smiler’s attempt to thwart Spider at every turn and probably kill him. Because this book was written 16 years ago but is still depressingly relevant to everything about modern life, the big incident chronicled in this volume is something called a ruinstorm, a gigantic, destructive bomb of wind and water that apparently used to be much more common before they figured out how to stabilize the climate and weather a little. The Smiler uses this ruinstorm as cover to basically get all the press and cops off the streets so he can hack into newspaper archives and delete a bunch of stuff. Spider, of course, is having none of this and is more determined than ever, but he is suddenly on a deadline—he gets diagnosed with a degenerative brain disease and has one year, maybe two, until he loses all his cognitive faculties. Most of this book serves largely to set the scene for the big showdown against the Smiler that’s coming later, but that doesn’t detract from the enjoyment of this volume. Originally posted at Of blue flu and brain disease.

  • Abhishek Das
    2018-10-03 07:14

    If the last volume of Transmetropolitan set the scene for Spider Jerusalem's endgame with the President of the United States, this volume continues to pile down on our not-so-hapless heroes. On the run, down on their luck, and reporting from the middle of the worst natural disaster to hit the city, Spider and his filthy assistants investigate a Sniper in the middle of the Print District and a disturbing lack of police presence.Ellis ratchets up the tension in this volume and the brisk pace of the story and my investment in these characters up to this point, kept the pages flying. Spider loses none of his bite despite staring down the barrel of his mortality. This cartoon character is finally, dare I say it, three dimensional.

  • Vittorio Rainone
    2018-10-01 14:19

    Ancora lui, Spider Jerusalem. In questo numero, un maremoto si abbatte sulla città, con nessuno a gestirlo per la contemporanea influenza "blu" di metà dei poliziotti. La conseguente evacuazione del quartiere dei media produce l'infiltrazione di sconosciuti al suo interno e la cancellazione di tutti i dati che Spider aveva in mente di usare contro il sorridente Callahan. Nel mentre, al nostro è diagnosticato un anno di vita per la sua abitudine di drogarsi di notizie, nella fattispecie una droga elettrica chiamata Polline - I che entro un anno gli "fotterà" il cervello. Momento critico per il nostro paladino dei media, descritto splendidamente dal dinamico duo che ha sfornato quello che, almeno fino all'ottavo volume, è un capolavoro del fumetto (post)moderno.

  • Martin Chalupa
    2018-10-22 08:22

    This volume is following the trend from previous ones. It is getting a bit more serious with less crazy dialogs and technological inventions around. It keeps pushing the main story forward. Spider is getting more and more obstacles in his way but hopefully he will overcome them in the last two volumes.

  • C. Varn
    2018-10-03 14:40

    Ellis' has real narrative and thematic clarity by this time in the arc, the violence and paranoia increases starkly but unlike in prior volumes, the stakes seem real and the farce goes away for more subtle satire. Spider's morality seems very real and "the Smiler" seems more than a figure of farce, but an outright dangerous man. Robinson's artistic texturing is great here.

  • Hellread
    2018-10-03 12:21

    Reviewing issues 41-60.Very similar to how it was before. Still having arc and plot and eventual conclusion is great. The issues also become more gritty and have better action. It still lacks something though.Ratings by issue: 3 4 5 4 4 4 4 5 4 4 5 4 4 4 3 4 5 5 5 5

  • Andrew Huey
    2018-10-13 12:24

    Getting closer to the end of Transmet... This one was a very quick read, largely because of a couple of stretches with very large panels and not much dialog. There are some good moments in here, and some good progression with the overall plot.

  • Friz
    2018-10-13 15:32

    flew through this one surprisingly fast. great twists and turns. we get somewhat of an emotional range from Spider outta Vol. 8. necessary drama build up for the last two volumes, and judging by the thickness of Vol. 10, it's finna be lit.

  • Đenis
    2018-10-11 10:14

    Ide do tuhého, Zhýralým životom to Spider dospel až k mozgovej degenerativnej poruche, ktorá mu nedáva mnoho času. Času na sundanie Hezouna. A tak začne posledná krízová výprava proti prezidentovi.

  • Drizztl
    2018-10-12 11:19

    7.5/10

  • Sam Quixote
    2018-10-18 15:37

    Warren Ellis has written the series so far with 3-issue bursts of a linear story with a couple of one shot issues that either expand the world or are side stories to the overall story arc but with “Dirge” he ditches this arrangement and goes straight out for the story arc. A sniper is picking off innocents in the Print District at the same time the police have “blue flu” and decide to call in sick, en masse. Something’s up and Spider’s on the case. If the carnage wreaked by the sniper weren’t enough, a ruinstorm (like a tsunami) hits the east coast turning the City into a disaster zone. And if that weren’t enough for a bad day, Spider gets the medical verdict on his recent health problems…“Dirge” takes what was already an insanely addictive storyline and turns it up to 11. From the opening shots of the sniper to the crescendo of the disaster weather, Ellis doesn’t let up on the throttle for a moment, careening the reader from one maniacal scene to another. He brings it down slowly for Spider to find out he has a brain disease and a limited amount of time before it destroys his mind, and then sends Spider into the penultimate confrontation between himself and the Smiler. This book is a roller-coaster journey for fans of the series and only serves to whet the reader’s appetite for more. Masterful storytelling from Ellis, art from Darick Robertson which is the best work he’s done on the series yet, this is a must-read for any fans of the series and an example of how comics can be more interesting than movies, TV, or the internet when it’s this good.

  • Brian
    2018-09-23 12:39

    A re-assuring leap in the right direction. Finally we see the clock ticking for Spider as he realizes that things are coming to a head: either he manages to start from scratch and pull enough evidence together to take out Callahan, or he dies trying. Spider finally gives a solemn promise to Callahan himself, in person, that it will be the former. That was all kinds of satisfying. Surely the last two issues will live up to the promise.As a small note, the psudo-mystery contained in this issue regarding the Blue-Flu was quite satisfying. The answer was not overly obvious but also made sense...although I simply assumed that Sipder somehow took his evidence with him when he left The Word. At any rate, the scale has reached epic proportions, with the mad president's reckless disregard for human life (including his own family's!) sill barely managing to keep his approval rating up and Spider nearly resource-less. Add to that some beautiful scenes that truly make you feel his coming demise and the effect it has on him and his assistants, and you realize that the conclusion will not disappoint...even if Spider loses. It has already passed the point of great social commentary and has firmly entered "one of the greatest stories every told" territory.

  • Asciigod
    2018-10-08 11:26

    It's painful to be the, thus far, only rating of this edition, and to give it one star. This truly isn't meant as an antagonistic hate-rating; the book legitimately disappointed me. In the Dirge arc, Ellis attempts to balloon a series of small ideas into an epic. More mature, sophisticated writers could have condensed this 140+ page story into a handful of pages to much better effect. Frank Miller would have established this minor dystopian vision, replete with renegade journalists and by-the-books cyberpunk trivia, in a single multipanel, wordless page. The wordless part is key; compared to Ellis's defiantly jejune dialogue silence would be golden. I can see what the appeal is: the dark, underground, paranoid realms are always alluring. But Ellis finds a way to strip the angles of all edges, and really leaves us with a lazy, formless product. His writing makes me feel embarrassment. It's so clearly un-hip and un-cool, yet dwells in total chain smoking oblivion to self-reflection.Life is short, and unfortunately I wasted 20 minutes on this collection. Perhaps Ellis's other works are stronger - I won't count him out yet. He does have a well regarded pedigree outside of this one book. Maybe one day I'll find something more polished of his to read.

  • Poonam
    2018-09-28 07:12

    I missed reading Volume 7. However, this book begins with a 'ruinstorm' in city. Spider figures something is happening in city alongside, premediated under 'blue flu' operation - where cops don't show up. A blur suit sniper is firing away in the city. In the end,he collapses unable to write his column based on what he found - his assistant Yelena steps in and writes a column under his name just so that his commitment is not delayed. That's as sentimental as you can get from Warren Ellis. ;) Turns out Spider has a brain degenerative disease with only a year to live and meanwhile Callahan seems to have moved to get all his evidence wiped from Word's archives. Yet Spider must get the truth out in the little time he has. There are black nice panels when Spider is stirring to consciousness and he wakes up yelling, 'Drugs is good for me'. The street signs are funny and antagonist as ever 'Sweet Corpse toffee', advertisement of home cloned 'piglet', kid wearing T-shirt saying 'little shit', woman with tattoo 'fuck me', Message in cab 'Do not maim or kill driver', popcorn bucket that reads as 'pup bucket' (QI is eating from it) and so on.

  • Vleegoodfellow
    2018-10-20 08:24

    Previous story arcs contrasted Spider against the noise and chaos of the city, so when he was loud and bombastic it was counterpointed with his bringing the audience insight so his attitude gained relevance. Indoor scenes served as more of a sanctuary, where he recharged his fury as he prepared for battle, and provided for more personal humor and self-reflection and dejection. In this book, the series has gotten back to a traditional narrative progression, but now it’s focused loosely around a mystery, and Spider is saddled with a gradually debilitating brain disease that will do him in within a year’s time. The book is readable, but it doesn't have that constant spark that other books had, with a few exceptions being a delusional episode where Spider is unconscious and the initial introduction of the President’s return to the city to address the disaster caused by the ruinstorm. Here he’s kind of out in the city environment even though things are kind of happening out there, but the city seems too reminiscent of the present, and when he’s indoors, conversations are vanilla by the standards of what the series has offered previously. The story isn't bad, just underdeveloped.

  • Dann
    2018-10-13 10:38

    Warren Ellis' graphic novel series is unmistakeably well written. The 90's art style perfectly suits the story, and even suits the cyberpunk genre. It is a gritty, ultra-violent series, with a nice, different take on hacker altruism, inspired by the sci-fi novels of the 80's. Having said that, it is a very difficult series to read. Pure nuggets of creativity are often dimmed by schizophrenic breaks--often by the protagonist--which, I understand, makes this series unique, and to some endearing, but I felt as if it worked against my enjoyment of the series.Overall, a lovely read for those interested in cyberpunk, or those gritty/edgy anti-heroes everybody loves.

  • Drew
    2018-10-12 14:28

    This is perfection, as far as this series goes. I really hope it sustains at this level for the last two installments, because I'd hate for this to've been the crowning moment - especially when everything seems like it can only get even more awesome. For fans of the series, this will make you want to rush out and buy the next two installments without delay - and if you aren't reading the series, how many times do I have to tell you (in the words of Spider himself) to get off your asses and get cracking? We all hate it here - but Spider makes us remember that it's still worth fighting for. More (as of tmrw) at RB: http://wp.me/pGVzJ-MV

  • Chelsea Jennings
    2018-10-01 07:16

    This series encompasses all the extremes of human life. It is at times disgusting and perverted, at others tender and inspiring, and all the while hilarious. Especially appropriate for our times, this series follows the work of outlaw journalist Spider Jerusalem, who works to expose corruption in the leaders of government and society. He engages in an ongoing battle against a president who harbors ill will towards humanity, and who systematically attempts to rewrite the constitution, omitting all rights to privacy, free speech, and freedom of the press. So very applicable to the current world of politics.