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beyond-identity

From the inner conflicts haunting the heroes of popular films, to issues of cultural heritage, and the silent conversations we have with ourselves before falling asleep, the question “Who am I?” is one deeply permeating the ethos of our age.With provocative insight and an eye for common sense application, theologian Dick Keyes makes a formidable contribution to this broadlFrom the inner conflicts haunting the heroes of popular films, to issues of cultural heritage, and the silent conversations we have with ourselves before falling asleep, the question “Who am I?” is one deeply permeating the ethos of our age.With provocative insight and an eye for common sense application, theologian Dick Keyes makes a formidable contribution to this broadly human and culturally chronic issue of identity. Where will we choose to find our sense of worth? Is it a choice? How will we measure success — if not with possessions, with relationships? And how much weight then, will we put on obtaining the approval of other people? In encountering these questions, Keyes asserts that human beings can only find themselves truly when they begin to look “beyond identity”, to a relationship with the God who made them. In Beyond Identity, Keyes elaborates on this premise and works through its implications for our understanding of selfhood and our relationships with others....

Title : Beyond Identity
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ISBN : 9780983276814
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 214 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Beyond Identity Reviews

  • Rapp
    2018-11-11 22:35

    In Beyond Identity, Dick Keyes addresses the pressing questions of identity facing people in the postmodern world. Indeed, there are few in the early twenty-first century who have not grappled with the question "Who am I?" or set out on a quest to "find themselves." Keyes sensitively suggests that when one sets out on such a quest, they may very well be asking the wrong question. As his title accurately indicates, Keyes argues that the postmodern person should move beyond the current fad or obsession with self-identity. The answer to our most penetrating questions of identity comes through "finding your self in the image and character of God," as his subtitle clearly says.There are few tasks as self-confrontational as that of writing a resume or curriculum vitae. Everything written on that page is an extension of yourself; for some, it is indeed the expression of their identity. Writing a resume is both a difficult and disconcerting task, for this piece of paper implies that what we done (or failed to do) and what we aspire to accomplish determines who we are. In a materialistic world, we easily derive our sense of worth from our accomplishments and possessions. In a reaction to such a world view, Romanticism attempted to place the emphasis upon our feelings and longings. Yet neither approach is a satisfactory or secure basis for identity: "Finding your true identity is not as simple as finding a lost object. It means finding an internal coherence and self-acceptance rooted in the God who made us all" (29). Indeed, identity means "absolute sameness"; yet there are few people who are so secure in their identity that they are the same, independent of their milieu.In Beyond Identity. Keyes begins with what he sees as the causes of the identity crisis, namely the Enlightenment's shift of focus from the Creator to the material world and its effects on our morals, models and social structures. From there he moves to the resolution of the crisis through a restored relationship with God and its prerequisites, such as honesty, humility and forgiveness. His discussions of guilt, shame and especially anger and the tongue, and their multifacted relationships to identity, are very insightful and thought provoking. For example, as seen in the story of the woman at the well, the burden of guilt so consumed the woman's identity that her guilt and sin is all she saw. She told her fellow townspeople that Jesus had told all she'd ever done, whereas Jesus had merely told her one thing about her. But for her, that one thing was everything about her. Keyes also dedicates a chapter to the interplay of identity within the family relationships of husband and wife, and children and parents. The principles of identity discussed in this book are not theoretical, but imminently practical and applicable. Dick Keyes was a student of the late Francis Schaeffer and is a leader of a L'Abri community in Massachusetts. If you've read Schaeffer, you will probably find commonalities in Keyes' Bible-based approach to intellectual questions. I found Keyes' clear applications of biblical principles refreshing. This book helps one look at situations through a biblical lens, and does much to affirm the Bible's relevance to current debates and dilemmas. This book is not long (200 pages), but its wisdom will reward reading and rereading.

  • Keith Feisel
    2018-11-03 00:56

    This book was first published in 1984.I spent some time with Dick Keyes at the L'Bri House in Worchester, MA in the 80s. The book had not yet been published, but the thoughts were there, and I was able to listen to his lectures/teachings on this series and then interact with him along with the other students there, over tea or after a meal around the dinner table.These were precious times, and I am sure he would invite any reading his book to continue the discussion...I was most impressed with his treatment of Colossians, and our identity in Christ. I had/have a tendency to beat myself up b/c of my shortcomings and sin (past and present). His commentary on our identity was liberating for me, realizing that I indeed could never earn God's favor, and that He was not in fact asking me to try.If you find yourself being pulled toward legalism, and yet you feel more like the tax-gatherer in Luke 18.9-14, than the Pharisee who was "praying to himself," then this book will be of benefit to you.Yes, it does have a tendency to be more theoretical than practical, but I sense that that has more to do with the personality of the writer than his degree, or lack thereof, of wisdom. The assumption is that the application will be made after careful contemplation, as was the case with me...

  • Josh Holloway
    2018-11-10 22:49

    Dick Keyes largely presents a reading of biblical identity that will be new to few readers. What sets this book apart from others is how aptly he diagnoses what exactly it is that may cause the christian or any other person to feel a lost sense of identity. This is primarally set out in the opening 2 chapters where he discusses where contemporary society looks to find their identity and then largely contrasts this with what the bible has to say throughout the rest of the book. It is always clearly presented and relate-able to the reader, a particular highlight is the chapter on forgivness