Read The Queen's Martian Rifles by M.E. Brines Online

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Does the secret to the origin of Mankind lie within the Great Pyramid of Mars?In this alternate steampunk adventure, the technical genius, Nicola Tesla, invented an anti-gravity coil that made steam-powered spaceships possible in the last decades of the 19th century. By 1899 the British Empire not only covers much of Africa, North America, Asia and the Pacific but also incDoes the secret to the origin of Mankind lie within the Great Pyramid of Mars?In this alternate steampunk adventure, the technical genius, Nicola Tesla, invented an anti-gravity coil that made steam-powered spaceships possible in the last decades of the 19th century. By 1899 the British Empire not only covers much of Africa, North America, Asia and the Pacific but also includes a moon base and a protectorate with the French over the backward civilization native to the planet Mars. But that empire, and those of the other western colonial powers have powerful extraterrestrial enemies no one even suspects exist – enemies that have renewed an age-old secret war against Humanity using all the supernatural powers at their command.The cast of characters is sprinkled with historical personalities such as Aleister Crowley, the famous occultist history remembers as “the wickedest man who ever lived,” and Viscount Sir James Bryce, British statesman, author, world traveler and mountaineer who claimed to have discovered Noah’s Ark on a mountain in eastern Turkey.His granddaughter, Lady Rebecca Bryce, is a militant suffragette and unorthodox scholar of antiquities determined to search the Martian pyramids of Cydonia for evidence of her theories on the extraterrestrial origin of human civilization. An educated and intelligent woman in a world that relegates females to insipid garden parties, she yearns to “set the male dominated science of archeology on its head.” She doesn’t believe she needs a man to fulfill her. But will she discover on Mars what she really needs?Recent college graduate David Mclaughlin wants to make a real difference in the world, not just “host tea parties for old ladies.” So he abandons his parents’ plans for him to become a clergyman and seeks adventure as an officer in the Queen’s Martian Rifle regiment. But snubbed and scorned by his “betters,” can David persevere and save the Earth from destruction?We also meet little Din, David’s personal servant and a member of the Martian Untouchable caste. His clan has patiently suffered in slavery awaiting a promised savior. But after more than three millennia, has God forgotten them?Can Aleister bring down Western Civilization? Who are the Ascended Masters? What really happened to Atlantis? The answers lie within The Queen’s Martian Rifles!...

Title : The Queen's Martian Rifles
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781465753069
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 508 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Queen's Martian Rifles Reviews

  • Gordon Harris
    2019-06-02 03:18

    I now have completed reading this book. It had similarities with a Burroughs-type of adventure, and you just have to let reality go and let the story take over. If you can do that, I think you'll like this book. The plot concerns a British army officer who is on his way to his new posting at a nondescript Martian outpost.On the way there, he meets the daughter of a disgraced archaeologist who is going to Mars to try to redeem her father's reputation.They arrive to find a squalid planet with rebellious native priests and a lazy, out-of-shape British garrison. Add to that elements of religion and conspiracy theories (Nibiru, the Great Flood, etc.) and things become very complicated for the two of them.Action builds until the exciting climax bursts upon us.I'd recommend this book to anyone with a Steampunky, action-adventure taste in books. I loved it!

  • Critique de Book
    2019-06-04 01:22

    What I liked: This was my first steampunk novel, and I was a little reluctant to read it. What I found, however, was a completely original, eclectic story – including travel to Mars! – with a pleasantly twisting plot and characters I really got into. The story moves quickly, and doesn’t take too long to be told.What I didn’t like: There is some religious stuff that I could have done without. Doesn’t detract from the story, though.In sum: This book convinced me that steampunk isn’t a genre to scared of. If you’re considering it, this is a good one to start with.

  • Ronald Tobin
    2019-06-14 03:07

    THE QUEEN'S MARTIAN RIFLES is presented as a Christian Steampunk Romantic Adventure. I think it lives up to most of that billing. Perhaps I use a different definition regarding 'romantic,' that aspect I really did not see. The story is set in an alternate 1899 in which Tesla invented a coil that allowed the construction of ether ships. The Mars in this book has a dying civilization and it also turns out the Martians are in fact humans. This Mars is of the sort envisioned by Jules Verne, with canals and ruined cities. The book starts very strong, with Lieutenant McLaughlin and archeologist Lady Rebecca Bryce with a contingent of the Martian Rifles being attacked by a large group of Martian fanatics just outside the Great Pyramid of Cydonia. They manage to get inside and escape their attackers. What they see inside the place would be familiar to any of us living in the 21st century, but seeing devices like computers described in 19th Century jargon was just awesome.After this strong start the book goes into a narrative about McLaughlin's trip to Mars during which he meets Aleister Crowley and Reverend Smythe which is where the Biblical material starts to come in. Brines does manage to mix this with the steampunk universe. He makes an interesting twist with the idea of Noah's Ark.Suffice it to say the Martians aren't happy about the men of Earth being there. The 'giants' of the Bible figure into the mainstream Martian religion. This leads to a coup against the Martian Emperor and an attack on Earth involving the smaller Martian moon Deimos.The editing was decent, which speaks well of a self published work. The only jarring error came towards the end, where they had been talking about Deimos consistently, then accidentally used Phobos instead.Brines can tell an entertaining tale. He makes the religious aspect work.That said, I don't know if he is trying to carve out a Christian Steampunk subgenre. I'm sure there would be room for it. My suggestion to them would be to drop the back cover statement about 'militant secular humanists.' That didn't add anything and is rather off putting.

  • Marijan
    2019-05-22 04:01

    I really liked it untill the very ending-which spoiled everything. I lost any interest in reading anything even remotely connected to it ot it's author.

  • Clay Davis
    2019-06-16 20:01

    It read like a 1889 Space story. Wonder if Din's first name maybe Gunga. Good use of scripture in this book.