Read The Plum Plum Pickers by Raymond Barrio Online

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The Clasicos Chicanos/Chicano Classics series is intended to ensure the long-term accessibility of deserving works of Chicano literature and culture that have become unavailable over the years or that are in imminent danger of becoming inaccessible. Each of the volumes includes an introduction contextualizing the work within Chicano literature and a bibliography of works bThe Clasicos Chicanos/Chicano Classics series is intended to ensure the long-term accessibility of deserving works of Chicano literature and culture that have become unavailable over the years or that are in imminent danger of becoming inaccessible. Each of the volumes includes an introduction contextualizing the work within Chicano literature and a bibliography of works by and about the author. The series is designed to be a vehicle that will help in the recuperation of Raza literary history and permit the continued experience and enjoyment of our literature by both present and future generations of readers.The Plum Plum Pickers is a social and proletarian novel that recreates the agricultural milieu where laborers are oppressed by landowners and their politicians, company executives, and groveling foremen....

Title : The Plum Plum Pickers
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780916950514
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 232 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Plum Plum Pickers Reviews

  • Nranger7
    2018-12-26 18:36

    Apparently this book got great reviews back in the 70s. I don't know if the spelling and grammar errors are supposed to be artistic or if it's just really bad editing. Artistic or not, I didn't like it. It just wasn't for me.

  • Tanaya
    2018-12-31 23:49

    This book was my inspiration for my college major - American Culture Studies - where I dreamt I could become a college professor and teach respect for cultural diversty through fiction. I loved it.

  • Elisabeth
    2019-01-16 16:58

    Barrio's The Plum Plum Pickers depicts the difficulties faced by a migrant community that work on the Turners' plum farm in Drawbridge of the Santa Clara County in California. The owner of The Western Grande fruit plantation, Frederick Turner, cares none for his produce pickers and only cares about the money they bring him through their labor. Barrio paints him as a heartless, greedy man who refuses to provide decent wages and decent living conditions for his workers. His manager, Mr. Quill feels disrespected by his boss and, in turn, treats the pickers poorly and without any compassion. Barrio leaves little to the imagination about the horrors of the living conditions of the migrant workers. For instance, Manuel and Lupe's children must be taught to relieve themselves outdoors and to use a hose to wash away their waste. Manuel almost faints several times while picking plums from lack of water and intense heat from the sun. When young Anglo bullies beat up several of the young men and almost rape two young women, the cops who happen to be in the area told the Mexican-Americans that they should stop fighting with one another. Margarita, a seventeen year old, attends the local high school where she must endure disrespectful leers from the young Anglo boys and threats from the Anglo girls who do not like that she attracts the attention of their boyfriends. When union leaders attempt to unionize the pickers, many of the workers fear them because they are so desperate to keep their jobs in order to feed their families. In this novel, Barrio shows the strong dependency that both the pickers and the plantation owns have for one another, but the Anglo owners who have the money always comes on top.

  • Leslie
    2019-01-16 22:48

    Hailed as an important work of Chicanx Lit, this book takes place in the famed Alviso ghost town called Drawbridge. It chronicles the plight of farmworkers in local orchards and fields. As I researched Drawbridge's history, I found no evidence of the newspaper, high school, or communities Barrio references. I even emailed an employee of the wildlife refuge where the town's remains sink into the marshland; she wrote Drawbridge was "mostly a vacation place for hunters and anglers, and there were no schools there." Other research yielded that by 1969 Drawbridge was almost deserted. So, I presume, the book is set in a fictionalized real place for symbolic or poetic purposes, maybe to signal that the mistreatment of immigrants and laborers ought to be abandoned like a ghost town. The book is deeply rooted in place and felt documentarian in tone; it describes street names and rivers and other markers from real San Jose. And yet, there's no way of knowing which details are "true" vs "symbolic." Whether or not this matters is something I'm still grappling with as a reader. I also was weirded out to find that Barrio was not himself Chicano; his parents were from Spain. Stylistically this book was uneven for me; I would describe it as pretty but sloppy. I found Barrio's use of dialect (for both white and Brown characters) unfortunate; sometimes they spoke like cartoon characters.