Read Pain Killer: A "Wonder" Drug's Trail of Addiction and Death by Barry Meier Online

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Pain Killer OxyContin, a potent painkiller containing opium-derived oxycodone as its key active ingredient, was first sold in 1996 as a treatment for cancer patients and other chronic pain sufferers. From the start, the drug's manufacturer aggressively marketed its patented time-release formula as a breakthrough in the effort to reduce prescription drug abuse. It wasn't loPain Killer OxyContin, a potent painkiller containing opium-derived oxycodone as its key active ingredient, was first sold in 1996 as a treatment for cancer patients and other chronic pain sufferers. From the start, the drug's manufacturer aggressively marketed its patented time-release formula as a breakthrough in the effort to reduce prescription drug abuse. It wasn't long, however, before thrill-seeking teenagers shattered that illusion of safety; by simply crushing an "Oxy," they were able to tap into a high so seductive it would come to dominate their lives. Some patients, seeking relief from pain, also found themselves drawn to the drug's dark side. Pain Killer takes readers on a journey of discovery that begins with the true story of Lindsay, a high-school cheerleader in Virginia who gets hooked on Oxys, and expands outward to explore the critical issues of legitimate pain management, prescription drug abuse, and how the misuse of science by the drug industry threatens the public good. With the fast-rising abuse of prescription drugs by young people ringing alarm bells within government, the how and why behind the OxyContin disaster is a gripping read not only for parents, but also for medical professionals, community leaders, business executives, and all those concerned with this crisis. The dangers described in Pain Killer also reverberate far beyond the threat from a single drug at a particular moment in time. The focus of our government's war on drugs has clearly misled many of us into thinking that only illegal drugs smuggled from beyond our borders can be abused. As Meier tells the dramatic story, some of the most deadly substances are produced and sold legally right here at home.THE EXTRAORDINARY AND TRUE STORY OF OXYCONTIN EQUAL PARTS crime thriller, medical detective story, and business exposé, Pain Killer takes a hard-hitting look at how a powerful drug touted as the salvation for millions triggered a national tragedy. At its inception, the legal narcotic OxyContin was seen as a pharmaceutical dream, a "wonder" drug that would herald a sea change in medical care while reaping vast profits for its maker. It did do that; but it also unleashed a public health crisis that cut a swath of despair and crime through unsuspecting small towns, suburbs, and cities across the country. As reports of OxyContin overdoses made front-page and network news, doctors, narcotics agents, regulators, industry executives, and lawmakers raced in, scrambling to slow the damage. Behind it all stood one of America's wealthiest families, and a drug company whose relentless promotion helped fuel the problem Written by award-winning journalist Barry Meier, whose special report in the New York Times triggered national interest in OxyContin, Pain Killer chronicles the rise of the multibillion dollar pain management industry and lays bare its excesses and abuses....

Title : Pain Killer: A "Wonder" Drug's Trail of Addiction and Death
Author :
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ISBN : 9781579546380
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Pain Killer: A "Wonder" Drug's Trail of Addiction and Death Reviews

  • Adam
    2019-01-06 21:57

    Read ~2009. Amazing must-read and told anyone remotely interested to read it. Just crazy and made my headspin and left me speechless. And yet here we are the bumbling amatuers in the White House feigning concern for poor whites that incredibly voted against their own self-interest to put the Trumpista Nutters in. Prescient book from 15 years before this epidemic opiates mess. Read about the crooked Sackler family, raking in billions from Purdue Pharma with greedy evil methods that make the Koch Brothers seem not so bad afterall. They're GOP donors too and have funded nasty groups, one of which is also Koch linked! Ha! There you go, makes sense. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...Incredible how doctors and patients fell for it and enriched Purdue with $32bn in annual sales and made the greedy Sacklers the 19th richest family in America (or world) according to Forbes.

  • Colin Roy
    2018-12-23 19:00

    An important and still rrelevant book about the myriad of agendas and movement behind the scenes that led to the current opium crisis.

  • Leslie Jonsson
    2019-01-14 23:07

    The stories Barry tells in this 2003 book could be told today, of addiction, death, and a pharmaceutical companies desire to not take the blame for causing issues with abuse, misuse and dependence.

  • Jeri
    2018-12-28 20:57

    Packed with dates and quotes and detailed information about the history of Purdue Pharma and OxyContin. Educational but a dense read.

  • Ice
    2019-01-03 20:51

    Investigative reporter Meier explores the troubling issues raised by the powerful prescription painkiller OxyContin, which touched off what many saw as an epidemic of addiction and crime, especially in Appalachia, where the drug became known as "hillbilly heroin.". At one level, Meier's story is a public health quandary pitting the interests of patients and their advocates in the "pain management movement"-which urges the increased use of strong opiates like OxyContin to help cancer patients and other victims of chronic pain-against the irrepressible urge of bored teenagers to abuse anything that will get them high. But it's also a cautionary tale about the corrupting influence of the profit motive on medicine. According to Meier, Purdue, the pharmaceutical company that makes the drug, touted it as a less addictive alternative to other formulations, then dragged its feet on restricting the drug when reports of addiction and illicit dealing began to come in-sometimes from its own salespeople.Meanwhile, Purdue launched a massive promotional campaign, complete with lavish ads, company-sponsored medical associations and physician-spokesmen, to convince doctors to prescribe OxyContin even for minor bouts of pain, thus fueling the drug's availability on the street. Meier combines a well-researched account of the medical controversy surrounding OxyContin with affecting reportage on one of its victims, a high school cheerleader whose life went into a tailspin once she encountered the drug. His book is an absorbing indictment of the modern health-care marketing industry, which, as depicted here, has blurred the line between medical "education" and shilling.Product DescriptionPain KillerOxyContin, a potent painkiller containing opium-derived oxycodone as its key active ingredient, was first sold in 1996 as a treatment for cancer patients and other chronic pain sufferers. From the start, the drug's manufacturer aggressively marketed its patented time-release formula as a breakthrough in the effort to reduce prescription drug abuse. It wasn't long, however, before thrill-seeking teenagers shattered that illusion of safety; by simply crushing an "Oxy," they were able to tap into a high so seductive it would come to dominate their lives. Some patients, seeking relief from pain, also found themselves drawn to the drug's dark side.Pain Killer takes readers on a journey of discovery that begins with the true story of Lindsay, a high-school cheerleader in Virginia who gets hooked on Oxys, and expands outward to explore the critical issues of legitimate pain management, prescription drug abuse, and how the misuse of science by the drug industry threatens the public good. With the fast-rising abuse of prescription drugs by young people ringing alarm bells within government, the how and why behind the OxyContin disaster is a gripping read not only for parents, but also for medical professionals, community leaders, business executives, and all those concerned with this crisis.The dangers described in Pain Killer also reverberate far beyond the threat from a single drug at a particular moment in time. The focus of our government's war on drugs has clearly misled many of us into thinking that only illegal drugs smuggled from beyond our borders can be abused. As Meier tells the dramatic story, some of the most deadly substances are produced and sold legally right here at home.THE EXTRAORDINARY AND TRUE STORY OF OXYCONTINEQUAL PARTS crime thriller, medical detective story, and business exposé, Pain Killer takes a hard-hitting look at how a powerful drug touted as the salvation for millions triggered a national tragedy. At its inception, the legal narcotic OxyContin was seen as a pharmaceutical dream, a "wonder" drug that would herald a sea change in medical care while reaping vast profits for its maker. It did do that; but it also unleashed a public health crisis that cut a swath of despair and crime through unsuspecting small towns, suburbs, and cities across the country. As reports of OxyContin overdoses made front-page and network news, doctors, narcotics agents, regulators, industry executives, and lawmakers raced in, scrambling to slow the damage. Behind it all stood one of America's wealthiest families, and a drug company whose relentless promotion helped fuel the problem

  • Leslie
    2018-12-23 19:14

    I really liked the beginning...the author tells the story of people who encountered OxyContin in its early days of abuse and the story of those abusing it. I breezed through the first half of the book, but then the 2nd half became much more of the investigative journalism style, including exposes about the ownership of the producing drug company, the history of the Sackler family, proceedings of trials and examples of correspondence between the DEA, FDA and Purdue Pharma. It was much harder to read. Or maybe it's just because I'm one of the "50 million" people Purdue claim are in chronic pain in the US and I find it harder to focus on details like that. One of the shocking details is that there is a system to monitor doctors and their prescribing habits...this was used by Purdue Pharma to market OxyContin to those who would be most likely to prescribe it but it was never used to detect or prevent abuse. Rather, drug company reps received commission on their sales, even if it was sales to a "pill mill". My only other comment about the book is that it covers the years 1999-2001 very thoroughly but ends around 2003 when it was published. I'm wondering what, if anything, regulators may have done with the drug since then...as much as I had a hard time with the book's 2nd half, I definitely want a post script follow-up that is up to date!

  • Richard Jeong
    2019-01-04 22:59

    This is a book that fits in a spot as a segway to more information as it develops. Written by a journalist as a result of the articles he was doing on OxyContin it's full of truly enlightening information and reads well because of it. It's unfortante that Purdue never actually chimed in, because it would have provided the point of view of both side the author was trying to provide. All in all though, it's fairly clear to me that OxyContin should not have been formulated with a mechanical delivery and/or it should have included Naloxone. This is truly an amazing story of where the lack of corporate liability and therefore the moral responsibility of companies generates an outrageous disregard for life or supposed ignorance of their effect in the pursuit of increase stock options.Pain is still an issue and should indeed still be managed, but not at the cost of the lives of the next generation, especially when it's possible to develop drugs that are good for pain, but not abuse friendly. We should also accept that some addiction is likely to happen given the personalities we generate with our society, and that we need real strategies to deal with it rather then throwing them in jail.

  • Rae
    2019-01-06 17:52

    An investigative examination of the marketing and subsequent abuse of the pain drug OxyContin.I was hoping for something that was more detailed about how OxyContin (and its related family of drugs) works within the body -- more of a medical analysis for the layman. This is not that book. Meier is a journalist and his writing, while good, is a lot like the newspaper, which is OK if that's what you're looking for. He focuses on the marketing of the drug and the culpability of its manufacturer. There is great detail when it comes to who said what to this person and that person etc. -- much more information than I cared to know, really. All this being said, the little bits about the drug itself were interesting. I'll keep looking for what I'm trying to find :)Just an OK read.

  • Jennifer
    2019-01-06 21:14

    While not quite as good as Sam Quinones's Dreamland (which edges it out by being the most thorough account I've read thus far), Barry Meier's book is also interesting--I read it in one day--and a thorough explanation of the OxyContin aspect of the opioid addiction crisis. As thorough as possible, anyway, given that it was written soon after the dimensions of the crisis became obvious, and some of the leading lights in Purdue Pharma refused to be interviewed by him. (Now there's a shock.) This would be a good place to start for a reader who wants to know the history of OxyContin and the company which markets it.

  • Zachary
    2018-12-21 21:13

    This is a well-written journalistic account of a perfectly predictable storm of addiction, crime, and tragedy that came out of ignored warnings about Oxycontin's addictiveness and easily bypasses slow-release mechanisms and rampant drug pushing by the company that made it. After the inevitable became evident, the company did all it could to stonewall any helpful actions by law enforcement or the people through their government via, in some instances, outright corruption. This is a tale of some of the most egregious crimes against a nation carried out in the name of corporate profit over any morals or sense of public good.

  • Wendy C
    2018-12-16 17:16

    This book is about OxyContin and the evil drug company that marketed the drug like it was a miracle pain cure with no side effects or risk of addiction. (Rush Limbaugh only being the most recent and high-profile victim proving that the drug has a darker side.) It's clear that Purdue, the drug's manufacturer, was aware of the dangers of abuse but continued to aggressively market it to doctors as a cure-all. Lots of people OD'ed and died. Why's it have to be small-town teens, and yet Rush lives on?

  • Anara Guard
    2018-12-22 22:20

    Groundbreaking work that brought much needed attention to how and why we are experiencing an epidemic of opioid overdose deaths.