Read The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe by Daniel Goffman Online

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Despite the fact that its capital city and over one third of its territory was within the continent of Europe, the Ottoman Empire has consistently been regarded as a place apart, inextricably divided from the West by differences of culture and religion. A perception of its militarism, its barbarism, its tyranny, the sexual appetites of its rulers and its pervasive exoticisDespite the fact that its capital city and over one third of its territory was within the continent of Europe, the Ottoman Empire has consistently been regarded as a place apart, inextricably divided from the West by differences of culture and religion. A perception of its militarism, its barbarism, its tyranny, the sexual appetites of its rulers and its pervasive exoticism has led historians to measure the Ottoman world against a western standard and find it lacking. In recent decades, a dynamic and convincing scholarship has emerged that seeks to comprehend and, in the process, to de-exoticize this enduring realm. Dan Goffman provides a thorough introduction to the history and institutions of the Ottoman Empire from this new standpoint, and presents a claim for its inclusion in Europe. His lucid and engaging book--an important addition to New Approaches in European History--will be essential reading for undergraduates....

Title : The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe
Author :
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ISBN : 9780521459082
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 383 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Ottoman Empire and Early Modern Europe Reviews

  • DoctorM
    2018-12-07 06:05

    Goffman looks at the Ottoman Empire as a key player in the affairs of early modern Europe rather than as an alien force on the edge of Christendom. He notes that in the 16th and 17th centuries, a huge proportion of Ottoman territory was in southeastern Europe, and that Ottoman trade relationships in the Mediterranean and into eastern and central Europe were extensive and deep. The book sometimes overstates the similarities between Ottoman political economy and the West and very much understates the role of Islam in defining the nature of Ottoman rule, but it makes very clear that in, say, 1600, the Ottoman Empire was as much a European power as an "Oriental" state, and that French and Habsburg diplomats and merchants treated it as such.

  • Luke
    2018-11-12 07:48

    Overall an excellent book. However, the author's goal is to place the Ottoman Empire in European history. Unfortunately, he does not take the time to define Europe, elaborate on its parameters, or explain what makes European history "European." Claiming that the Ottoman Empire was "European" in 1600 does not offer much mean because we have not exactly established what "Europe" is.

  • Victoria
    2018-12-07 08:44

    Not terrible, but raises more questions than it answers. Argues that the Ottoman Empire played a significant role in the development of Europe, that it was not marginalized, that Orientalism per se did not exist in the 16th and 17th centuries, that what has been characterized as "decline" (which teleologically points to the end of the Empire in the 20th century) actually only points to crisis and development in another direction than Europe followed, and that it was, after all, far more European than historians have credited. Hugely problematic for not actually defining what is meant by "Europe" or "European", and for utterly downplaying differences between Islamic and Christian cultures, and their role in the development of their respective societies. Solid as a textbook (as it is what it is).

  • AC
    2018-11-16 06:40

    Goffman argues that Ottoman Turkey had more in common with Europe than differences -- not entirely persuasively. The rest of the book looks like pretty solid social-institutional history. There is an excellent 10-page, annotated bibliography at the end.

  • Manal
    2018-11-19 13:03

    Introduced a different perspective to the presence of the Ottoman Empire: one that isn't as prevalent in contemporary history. Definitely sparked my interest in learning more about the relationship between Christian and Islamic Europe. Also a relatively short read.

  • Katie
    2018-11-27 11:53

    Convincing argument and enjoyable "historical fiction" vignettes to keep your attention.

  • Sarah Furger
    2018-11-11 11:48

    Finally finished this guy. Very well researched, excellent use of sources, and a great starting place for Ottoman Studies.